Arash Hejazi’s Interview with SVT TV

Arash Hejazi’s Interview with SVT TV: In “47 Seconds” depicts Arash Hejazi lives of Iranians who went from the Shah’s oppression to ayatollans terror. What awaits after the revolutions in the Middle East? IntervArash Hejazi’s Interview with SVT TV: In “47 Seconds” depicts Arash Hejazi lives of Iranians who went from the Shah’s oppression to ayatollans terror. What awaits after the revolutions in the Middle East? Interviewer: Bengt Westerberg.iewer: Bengt Westerberg.

You can watch the interview here (ENGLISH)

The Gaze of the Gazelle appears in New Yorker!

The Gaze of the Gazelle by Arash Hejazi has appeared this week in the Book Bench Section of the New Yorker, under In the News: A New Psycho, Boozy Books:

“In his new memoir, Arash Hejazi recalls the moment Neda Agha-Soltan was shot, during Iran’s Green Movement protests—as he stood next to her.”

Read more http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2011/12/in-the-news-a-new-psycho-boozy-books.html#ixzz1gKRfTkaR

The author Arash Hejazi is haunted by moments in Tehran

David Mattin

The National, Dec 11, 2011

Arash Hejazi smokes hand-rolled cigarettes, which he keeps in a silver case. He speaks a considered, professorial English, idiosyncratic only because of his Iranian accent. Despite having endured much since the summer of 2009, he exudes the guileless energy of a very young man (he is 37).

You may not have heard Hejazi’s name before, but it’s likely that you already know something of his story. During the Green Movement protests that swept across Iran in the summer of 2009, Hejazi was standing next to a young woman when she was shot. He bent over her prostrate body as she lay dying, in an unsuccessful attempt to save her life. A video of those events was posted online and soon became international news: images of Hejazi and the tragic girl were transmitted into hundreds of millions of living rooms. That girl was Neda Agha-Soltan, and she became a symbol of a new Iranian generation, their dream of freedom, and the brutal suppression of that dream.

Continue reading

Arash Hejazi’s interview with Radio Netherland about his memoir The Gaze of the Gazelle

As British embassy officials flee Iran, we speak to an Iranian man in the UK: Arash Hejazi.

He’s the doctor who tried to rescue Neda Agha-Soltan, the young woman who was shot during the 2009 protests in Tehran and became an icon of the struggle for democracy there. YouTube: Death of Neda (warning: graphic content)

Arash talks to host Jonathan Groubert about living through four decades of tumult in Iran before finally hitting his breaking point.

The Gaze of the Gazelle is Arash Hejazi’s memoir of growing up and then fleeing Iran.

Listen to the full interview here

 

 

Her Eyes Have Followed Me – Interview with Arash Hejazi on The Gaze of the Gazelle – Isis Magazine

Source: Joseph D’Urso, Isis Magazine, University of Oxford, 18 November 2011

The violent death of Neda Agha-Soltan is perhaps the most watched in history. The astonishing video which depicts her murder shocked the world when it emerged during the protests following Iran’s 2009 presidential elections. Neda, and thousands more like her, believed that the published result which indicated a clear and unprecedented victory for Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was a consequence of flagrant electoral fraud. She was shot dead at point blank range by a Basiji, a member of the Iranian regime’s voluntary militia, on a crowded street during a peaceful protest. The Basiji’s tactic on that day was to scatter clusters of demonstrators by shooting one individual in each cluster. Arash Hejazi is the man who can be seen in that video wearing a white shirt and blue jeans. He is fruitlessly attempting to prevent the transfusion of Neda’s blood from inside her chest onto the Tehran pavement.
Continue reading

Dr Shaheed, what you have presented is just the tip of the iceberg

Arash Hejazi’s open letter to Dr Ahmed Shaheed, Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran

Dear Dr Ahmed Shaheed,
Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran,

I am Arash Hejazi, an Iranian physician, writer, publisher and journalist, and the Doctor who tried to save the young girl shot to death by the Iranian Basij or the pro-government militia, orchestrated by the Revolutiosnary Guards of the Islamic Republic of Iran. I then spoke up about the circumstances of hear death to the international media and for that I have lost my publishing house in Iran, I have been prosecuted and persecuted, and I have had to go on exile, leaving my family and my life behind.

I read your Special Report with interest, and while I appreciate your efforts on producing an accurate image on the dyre situation of human rights in Iran, I would like to bring to your attention that what you have presented in your report, is just the tip of an immense iceberg of years of undermining human and basic rights of the citizens of Iran.

You didn’t mention,

The memoir of a little boy who became a revolutionary for truth

Source: Middle East Book Review

We talk about the tyranny of the Shah of Iran and the even worse tyranny of the Mullah’s that followed. We talk about the politics of Iran today and its role in terrorism, violence and the instability of the Middle East. We talk about the conflict that the United States started using their dictator pal Saddam Hussein, and quickly forget the hardships that were wrought on the people of Iran and also Iraq. And we talk about the Middle East conflict as if it is just another story.

Yet what we don’t talk about are the lives that were destroyed and permanently altered, reshaped violently and the many deaths, most of the dead are names and faces we will never know or see.

Iran has been but a political square in a political debate. But it is a nation of enslaved people, enslaved under the pro-Western backed tyrant the Shah Reza Pahlavi and then by the Ayatollah Khomeini and then again by the little dictator President Ahmedinejad.

Arash Hejazi tells the story to the Western World that is so ignorant of the facts of the Middle East and the Persian Gulf and the Islamic World in a way that puts a human face on its cover. “The Gaze of the Gazelle” is a poignant retelling of all the history we have accepted as political rhetoric in a human form. The story of real people who were impacted by our policies and our political viciousness and our stereotyped rhetoric and racism in America.

Continue reading

The End of Illusion; a review on The Gaze of the Gazelle

Source: The New Republic, 17 October 2011

THIS BOOK IS a story of failure—the failure of the Islamic Republic, despite thirty years of propaganda and political education, to inculcate in a new generation of Iranians faith in the ideology of the regime. The children of the revolution of 1979 have turned their backs on its values; and this was nowhere more evident than in the mass protests against the manipulated presidential elections of 2009. The young joined the protests in hordes; and the regime’s harsh suppression of these protests, along with the widespread arrests, torture and deaths in prison that followed, were the final steps in delegitimizing the Islamic Republic and its barren ideology.

The generation of Arash Hejazi’s parents embraced the revolution; and their children volunteered to defend it when Iraq invaded Iran in 1980. But when, as young adults, they took to the streets two years ago to ask, “Where is my vote?” they were mowed down by the regime’s goons and security forces. These young men and women were not afraid. They had fought every effort by the regime to isolate them from the West, and now they used their cell phones and their blogs, their videos and the Internet to broadcast to the world the violence taking place on the streets of Tehran. As Hejazi writes, “We were also a generation that, for lack of anything else to do, spent its time learning. We were the true witnesses of our nation.”

Continue reading